Lydia Loveless – Somewhere Else
Feb18

Lydia Loveless – Somewhere Else

Lydia Loveless Somewhere Else Bloodshot; 2014 By Stephen M. Deusner  February 17, 2014 7.3 In the first song on her third full-length, Somewhere Else, Lydia Loveless goes to a party, does some blow, calls up an ex, and tries to break up his marriage. A few songs later, she compares herself to Paul Verlaine, the 19th-century French poet whose relationship with the teenageArthur Rimbaud was notoriously violent. On another song, our heroine drinks herself to sleep while dreaming of an old lover and his talents between the sheets. Never leery of casting herself as the homewrecker, the other woman, or the spurned lover, Loveless writes lyrics that are frank (“I just like it so much better when we’re coming to blows”) and often explicit (“Don’t stop giving me head”). Her songs are based in country, but she tweaks the forms and formulas of the genre with a bleary belligerence that is, more often than not, directed at herself. Her self-destructive streak makes Somewhere Else both a bracing and a deeply harrowing listen. Loveless hails from Columbus, Ohio, and she’s so far the most visible member of a very musical family: Both sisters are in local groups, and before she had to fire him, her dad played drums in her backing band. After a slick debut and a more countrified follow-up on Bloodshot Records (which earned her a shout-out from Richard Hell), Somewhere Elsesounds like the lyrical and musical culmination of a short career spent kicking at the conventions of alt-country. The album takes more risks than its predecessors did, showcasing a rough-and-tumble bar-band sound that dispenses with the twang in favor of barbed guitars and rowdy rock rumble. Loveless and her band recall the West Coast cowpunk attitude of early 80s acts like Lone Justice, plus the sexual candor of heyday Liz Phair. Loveless’ frankness threatens to make a her a novelty, but there’s some sharp humor and deep hurt here. “When I was 17 I’d follow men around with my head jammed way in their ass,” she sings on “Chris Isaak”, and it sounds ridiculous. Fortunately the next line is, “Oh, what I wouldn’t give to still be able to conjure up energy like that”—which implies that making a wreck of your life is preferable to doing nothing at all with it. Even as Somewhere Elsedescends into romantic mania, Loveless keeps her wits about her. She sings “Head”, arguably the album’s best and most urgent track, as though her despair had turned sexual. Loveless storms into the chorus, turning the repeated lines into a potent hook and delivering an abrasive guitar solo that conveys what the lyrics cannot. Perhaps...

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The Cure is releasing a new album, touring its old albums
Feb03

The Cure is releasing a new album, touring its old albums

Marah Eakin The Cure will release its fourteenth studio album later this year. 4:14 Scream will be out at some yet-to-be-determined point in the next few months; it was recorded at the same time as 2008’s 4:13 Dream, making the tunes at least six years old. Unfortunately, there’s precious little information available beyond that. Not unlike Mean Girls‘ Gretchen Wieners, Robert Smith is good at keeping secrets; that’s why his hair’s so big.   The band has announced that it will be releasing a live concert DVD simultaneously, and that it will also be doing a number of upcoming shows. But instead of focusing on the new material, like The Cure’s past “Trilogy” tours in 2002 and 2011, they’ll be dedicated to playing three of the group’s older albums in their entirety—this time The Top, The Head On The Door, and Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me. Follow this link: The Cure is releasing a new album · The A.V....

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