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Demented McDonald’s Metal Act ‘Mac Sabbath’ Jam Black Sabbath Fast Food Parodies

Posted by on 11:33 pm in Bands, Live, WTF? | 0 comments

Demented McDonald’s Metal Act ‘Mac Sabbath’ Jam Black Sabbath Fast Food Parodies

by Graham ‘Gruhamed’ Hartmann            December 23, 2014 Yesterday, we shared a video of Zakk Wylde teaming up with Ozzy Osbourne bassist Blasko and the Cult drummer John Tempesta to perform a full set of Black Sabbath songs under the name ‘Zakk Sabbath.’ The gig at West Hollywood’s iconic Roxy Theater was a sight to be seen, but this extremely bizarre Sabbath-based band takes it to the next level. Meet Mac Sabbath, a band comprised of demented McDonald’s characters re-imagining the immortal tunes of Black Sabbath. Instead of ‘Paranoid,’ they’ve got ‘Pair-a-buns.’ Instead of ‘Iron Man,’ Mac Sabbath have ‘Frying Pan’… you get the picture. Mac Sabbath’s fast food lyrics are pretty funny at times, but the band’s hilarity lies more in presentation. Led by seemingly coked-out clown Ronald Osbourne, Mac Sabbath is flanked by warped McDonald’s creatures. On guitar, Mayor McCheese shreds through Tony Iommi‘s monster riffs and bluesy solos while sporting tusks reminiscent of Motorhead mascot Snaggletooth. The Hamburglar fills in for the mighty Bill Ward on drums while our favorite, a skullet-sporting Grimace with a case of lazy tongue, jams Geezer Butler‘s bass lines. Check out the odd act perform ‘Pair-a-buns’ and ‘Frying Pan’ in the clips above and below, respectively. Via Loudwire Complete Albums Box...

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Incubus Plotting Two New EPs for 2015

Posted by on 4:14 pm in Bands, News | 0 comments

Incubus Plotting Two New EPs for 2015

by Chad Childers                        December 18, 2014   Earlier this year, Incubus teased that they had returned to the studio and now it appears that they’re closing in on their next release… or should we say releases. According to Billboard, the band has just inked a new record deal and they’re planning to issue two new EPs in 2015. Guitarist Mike Einziger told the site, “We’re planning on releasing two installments that will total an album — two EPs. We’re hoping to put out the first one in February or March, then the summer.” Fans who caught the band this past weekend at KROQ’s Almost Acoustic Christmas show caught the first new song, ‘Trust Fall,’ from Incubus’ upcoming works. Einziger says, “It’s pretty indicative of where we are now. It’s pretty ambitious.” The guitarist added that Incubus have a diverse collection of material, telling Billboard, “Most of the music we’ve written is high energy. But we’ve written our slowest song, but also our heaviest song.” The latter track he’s referring to is called ‘Make Out Party.’ Another song title revealed during the chat is ‘Dance Like You’re Dumb,’ a cut that Einziger described as “our version of a loud aggressive rock song. It’s definitely not what someone would expect from us.” The group just inked a deal with Island Records, who will release the two EPs. Source: Loudwire   Make...

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Watch: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory Gets Full Primus Treatment

Posted by on 11:58 pm in Featured, Phreaky Notes | 0 comments

Watch: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory Gets Full Primus Treatment

by Rob Slater        December 18, 2014 Earlier this year, Primus introduced us to the wackiest, most original take on the Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory soundtrack. Now, much like Dark Side of the Moon and The Wizard of Oz, fans can get a first hand glimpse at what the Primus interpretation of the soundtrack sounds like when synced up with the film. Les Claypool spoke to us about his affection for the film, saying, “This was a project I’d been thinking about for a while. I knew I wanted to take on some sort of sacred cow.” The band originally explored the theme during their 2013 New Year’s Eve show, when they recreated the soundtrack on stage. They liked it so much that they decided to take that idea into the studio and reimagine the whole thing. Watch the full movie below. (via Jambase) Source: Relix   Primus & The Chocolate Factory with the Fungi...

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20 BEST METAL SONGS OF 2014

Posted by on 4:51 pm in Featured, Metal | 0 comments

20 BEST METAL SONGS OF 2014

by Loudwire Staff It’s that time of year again! With 2014 coming to a close, we look back on the metal songs which impacted our ears since Jan. 1. For this list, we’re taking into account fan response, songwriting prowess, popularity, creative progression, technical ability and many more dynamics. After a year’s worth of thought, listening to everything we can get our hands on and keeping our ears to the ground, we give you our choices for the 20 Best Metal Songs of 2014! 20 ‘Heavy Bough’ Alunah British doom act Alunah released the killer ‘Awakening the Forest’ album this year, led by the track ‘Heavy Bough.’ The piece of doom psychedelia is a slow burn which becomes increasingly hypnotic as frontwoman Soph Day begins her calm vocal approach. The rest of ‘Heavy Bough’ is carried by a solid instrumental foundation reminiscent of classic Black Sabbath, though the song consistently maintains its own identity. 20  ‘We Knew Him Well’ Down After the awesome ‘Down IV Part I – The Purple EP’ in 2012, was there ever any doubt that its companion piece would be awesome too? From ‘Down IV – Part II,’ the new track ‘We Knew Him Well’ is pure NOLA sludge. Philip Anselmo‘s vocals are dirty as hell while the instrumental section of Down trudge along with a groove-heavy backdrop. Anselmo has plenty of room to move around vocally in ‘We Knew Him Well,’ and the Pantera legend uses that space to his full advantage. 18 ‘Implode’ Slayer Slayer will always sound like Slayer, but it’s always refreshing when the pinnacle thrash band cranks out a track that feels timeless. Slayer premiered ‘Implode’ at the 2014 Revolver Golden Gods Awards in what was largely thought to be the show’s high point. Even when performed after immortal Slayer anthems ‘South of Heaven’ and ‘War Ensemble,’ ‘Implode’ sounded strong, fitting in snugly as the final piece of Slayer’s three-song set. The band offered a free download of ‘Implode’ almost immediately after the Golden Gods gig, and we offer our thanks in return. 17  ‘Baring Teeth For Revolt’ Goatwhore Goatwhore is a one-of-a-kind band. They boys have the ability to stick with their death, black and heavy metal roots while creating anthems that will crawl into your ears and stay there. For ‘Baring Teeth for Revolt,’ guitarist Sammy Duet offers an old-school riff over battlecry lyrics like, “We are coming to taste their blood / We are coming defile their gods.” 16  ‘Gloryhole’ Steel Panther Steel Panther have brought heavy metal back once again, this time through a hole drilled inconspicuously into a bathroom stall. From the band’s third album, ‘All You Can Eat,’ ‘Gloryhole’ is everything you want in a Steel Panther side-splitter. Guitarist Satchel leads the song with a powerful riff while singer Michael Starr unapologetically delivers lines such as “I don’t wanna know / Who’s sucking my c–k tonight / I’m going to the gloryhole / Gonna f— it with all my might.” The song’s bridge is actually the track’s high point, with anthemically beautiful vocal harmonies topping a perfect instrumental soundscape. 15  ‘Triumph of Death’ Vader One could argue that Vader‘s ‘Tibi Et Igni’ was an album unfairly overlooked by many. After 31 years and 10 albums of pure death metal, some tend to take our...

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Heaven Below’s Patrick Kennison Set To Rock With Lita Ford

Posted by on 11:27 pm in Artist, Metal, Phreaky Notes | 0 comments

Heaven Below’s Patrick Kennison Set To Rock With Lita Ford

 BY: Bear Frazer The musician cut his teeth in Union Underground, then went on to lead Heaven Below and, along the way, picked up a gig in Lita Ford’s band. And, despite the semi-hazy memory, he remembers living with Papa Roach and Linkin Park getting booed off stage. Kennison co-founded San Antonio, Texas nu-metal act Union Underground in 1996 with lead singer Bryan Scott, and they achieved their biggest success when they released their debut album, An Education In Rebellion, in 2000 via Columbia. Amidst singles like “Turn Me On ‘Mr. Deadman'” and “Revolution Man,” and securing a slot on the 2001 edition of Ozzfest, they became well known for their song “Across The Nation,” which served as the theme song to WWE’s Monday Night Raw. But after getting dumped by Columbia, and inner turmoil, the group disbanded and Kennison retreated to Los Angeles, California. Though he did some studio work, he “found his balls” in 2008, formed hard rock troupe Heaven Below, and decided to step up to the mic and try his hand at frontman, in area where he continues to excel to this day. Though Heaven Below are currently putting the finishing touches on their third full-length album, he is now pulling double duty as he joined Lita Ford‘s band as one of their guitarists back in October. Together, they are working on her next studio effort, due out sometime next year. He stays busy, but if you ask Kennison, he isn’t busy enough, nor does he sleep much at all. In this Arena exclusive, Patrick talks about becoming a full-fledged member of Lita Ford’s band. He also reflects on his days in Union Underground, remembers whenLinkin Park was booed off stage, recalls living in the same apartment complex withPapa Roach, and reveals what’s next with Heaven Below. Arena: You’re from San Antonio, and now you’re living out west in Los Angeles. That said, what’s it like for a Texas boy out there in Cali? Patrick: Well the first shocker is L.A. is a lot more expensive than San Antonio (laughs). I was born and raised in San Antonio, and by the time Union Underground got going, I don’t want to say I conquered the city because no one ever conquers the city, but I went further than I was expecting to, so it only made sense I moved to Los Angeles after Union Underground. Arena: I must to admit, I almost didn’t remember that you were in Union Underground at first because it’s been so long. Patrick: Those were good times, from what I can remember (laughs). Arena: Right? Well let’s spark your memory. Talk to me about the meteoric rise of Union Underground because it was short-lived. You guys blew up in the late 90s, along with seemingly everyone else in the nu-metal movement, but disbanded around 2002 and then you went out on your own. How would you describe that time? Patrick: The way I describe it to everybody is … remember that show Behind The Music, the show about all your favorite legendary bands? Arena: Dude, I’m a music journalist. Every day for me feels like Behind The Music. Patrick: (Laughs) Exactly! Well Union Underground managed to do all the Behind The Music clichés. Instead of cramming it into a career, we did...

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David Bowie – Nothing Has Changed

Posted by on 12:14 am in Reviews | 0 comments

David Bowie – Nothing Has Changed

David Bowie Nothing Has Changed (3-CD Deluxe Edition) Columbia / Legacy; 2014 By Douglas Wolk  November 20, 2014 8.8 BEST NEW REISSUE To pick a few selected works from an artist’s career is to construct an argument about that artist. Every curator knows that, and David Bowie is nothing if not a curator. The first great Bowie best-of was 1976’s Changesonebowie LP, whose argument was that he was a mamapapa comin’ for you, a rocker too strong and too glittery to be pinned down. (The 1981Changestwobowie LP and the 1990 Changesbowie CD, stabbed in its gut by the dreadful remix “Fame ’90”, tried to extend that premise.) Bowie’s initial attempt at a full-career assessment was the 1989 Sound + Vision box set, revised and updated in 2003. In both forms, it’s a bunch of hits and album tracks and rarities clumped together, an impressive show of range whose failure is that it assumes, rather than argues, that he’s a rock god and that therefore anything he does is interesting. Twenty-five years later, coinciding with an actual touring museum exhibition of the apparatus around his music, Bowie has assembled a new retrospective. Nothing Has Changed—a very sly title, as a riposte to Changesonebowie and “Changes”, especially since it’s also a lyric lifted from his 2002 song “Sunday”—comes in three different versions, each with a cover image of Bowie regarding himself in a mirror. That’s a sharp gesture too: he’s never been shy about his fascination with his own mercurial self, shedding his skin again and again and then carefully preserving it to wriggle into again later. (This is not the first time he’s done the “multiple versions of a greatest-hits set” trick, either: 2002’s Best of Bowie had twenty different track lineups, depending on which country you bought it in.) The weakest of the three versions of Nothing Has Changed is the chronologically sequenced 2xCD version. It’s basically just a slight revision of Best of Bowie, compressed to throw in five later songs including the newly recorded oddity “Sue (or In a Season of Crime)”. The first disc starts with his commercial breakthrough “Space Oddity” and ends with its sequel/repudiation “Ashes to Ashes”, which is a nice bit of symmetry. Mostly, what we get is Bowie as he’s understood by oldies radio, although we’re seven tracks in before he really starts to toughen up (with “Ziggy Stardust”). But the second half of the 2xCD version covers three times as many years as the first, and suggests that Bowie was a temporarily interesting trend-follower whose fade-out has been slowed by his being repeatedly propped up and dragged into modernity by big-name collaborators: Queen, Pat Metheny, Pet Shop Boys, Trent Reznor, James Murphy. This Bowie’s sense of tune eventually abandons him and never returns. After the look back in sorrow of “Absolute Beginners”, halfway through the second disc, he’s coasting on his rep; it’s just one decent comeback attempt after another, with “Sue” at the end as a sort of I-give-up-but-here’s-something-new-anyway gesture. That’s a reasonable case to make; it also misses most of what’s magical about this particular artist. The 2xLP version of Nothing Has Changed makes a simpler and happier argument, that this is a dude with a lot of big hits and a peculiar arty streak. It’s a non-chronological set,...

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Amanda Palmer Releases Her Book. And You Should Buy It…

Posted by on 11:32 pm in Artist | 0 comments

Amanda Palmer Releases Her Book. And You Should Buy It…

“Everybody struggles with asking for fear of being vulnerable” – Amanda Palmer in The Art of Asking

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Who is Lydia Loveless?

Posted by on 12:30 am in Bands, Featured, Ones to Watch | 0 comments

Who is Lydia Loveless?

“They’re a band. They’re a band. They’re a fucking great band.”

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Phantogram: Awkward Middle School Years Turned Electro-Pop Phenom

Posted by on 11:30 am in Check Em Out, Featured | 0 comments

Phantogram: Awkward Middle School Years Turned Electro-Pop Phenom

“I love how artists and genres are starting to do separate things by bringing other sounds and influences into their own. That is kind of the definition of Phantogram, in general. It’s always great to see that happen with other bands and artists. There’s only so much you can do in a particular genre, so it’s nice to see people dive into other sounds.”

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‘Weird Al’ Yankovic’s ‘Mandatory Fun’: Track-by-Track Album Review

Posted by on 8:16 pm in Reviews | 0 comments

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic’s ‘Mandatory Fun’: Track-by-Track Album Review

By Kenneth Partridge | July 15, 2014 3:26 PM EDT Billboard Rating:  76 It’s hard out there for a professional parodist: nowadays, any idiot with a webcam can post his or her version of “Fancy” on YouTube, and if a master idiot like “Weird Al” Yankovic wants to get us tweeting about his send-ups, he’d better make them extra special. On “Mandatory Fun,” the 14th album of his crazy-long, crazy-pants career, the Weird One delivers the reprocessed goods, though it’s his original tunes — done in the idiosyncratic styles of his favorite artists — that truly warrant repeat listening. On the parody front, Yankovic wisely plucks low-hanging fruit, turning Lorde’s “Royals,” Imagine Dragons’ “Radioactive,” Pharrell’s “Happy,” and the aforementioned Iggy Azalea summer jam into songs about food storage, sloth, tactlessness, and home repair. Best of all is “Word Crimes,” a handy grammar lesson based on Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines.” While it’s foolhardy to read too much into Al’s lyrics, a tune like “Word Crimes” captures the zeitgeist in more ways than one. Digital culture hasn’t simply obliterated the English language — it’s accelerated the chew-’em-up, spit-’em-out celebrity hype cycle that’s turned Thicke from R&B star to laughing stock virtually overnight. Now, Yankovic isn’t goofing on “Blurred Lines” because he, like many critics, thinks its author is a slime ball. Al’s far too good-natured for that. But let’s face it: The last thing Thicke needs right now is another person making him look silly. In addition to track-specific remakes, Yankovic serves up a string of his patented “style parodies,” which speak to his broad taste in music. When he’s not scanning the FM dials for words he can rhyme with types of food, Al apparently gets down to Southern Culture on the Skids, Pixies, Foo Fighters, and Cat Stevens. On “Mandatory Fun,” he pays homage to these and others with varying degrees of cleverness, and by referencing the non-mainstream likes of SCOTS and Pixies, he smartly nods to an older audience that likely remembers him for his ’80s-era MTV ubiquity. Is it “Sgt. Pepper’s?” No, “Mandatory Fun” certainly is not. But if anyone ever makes a “Sgt. Pepper’s” that’s actually about pepper—and the various foodstuffs you can sprinkle it on—it’ll be “Weird Al.” Read on to get our track-by-track take on Yankovic’s latest blast of inanity. 1. “Handy”: After a weak opening line — “First things first, I’m a craftsman” should have been something like, “First things first, I’m a drill-est” — Al takes this musically spot-on “Fancy” parody in some rather crafty (ahem) directions. There are rhymes about installing Formica countertops, laying tile, and fixing leaf blowers — all delivered by the world’s most braggadocious contractor. Here’s the motto for the side of his van: “Let me glue ‘dat, glue ‘dat / screw ‘dat, screw ‘dat.” 2. “Lame Claim to Fame”: Fans not familiar with Southern Culture on the Skids might mistake this for a remake of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Run Through the Jungle,” and Al’s probably cool with that. Grasping his semi-obscure musical reference isn’t really a prerequisite to chuckling along with this examination of our celeb-obsessed culture. 3. “Foil”: Lorde should feel honored: on “Mandatory Fun,” “Royals” is the only tune Yankovic re-imagines as a song about food. Fortunately, he doesn’t stop by telling us why aluminum...

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